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Interviews

Katie Union
Valerie Tarico
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Sarah Jane, fetishista
Elizabeth Butters
Lou Minatti
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Laura Molina
Lori Petty
Ute Lemper
Evan Dorkin and Sarah Dyer
Space Ghost
Hasil Adkins
Maestro Henry Holt
Dick Dale
Leonard Knight

Copy...right?

Negativland vs. The Man
Negativland's Fair Use
Craig Baldwin
Sonic Outlaws
Tape-beatles

Fully corrugated

Forcing Jesus Into Burning Man
Deadbolt TV
Realiteevee
666 Cough Syrup
666 Attack!
Inheriting Mickey's Mantle
Hemp, Commerce, Freedom
Your Brain on Smart Drugs
Spacecraft or Lovecraft?
Panther
Choco Tacos
The Kennedy Mystique

Arizona: Could be the water, could be the lack of it

Gary Bear
The World of Brian Stewart
The El Guapos
Duck diapers
Duck ban
Rainer Ptacek
The All-Spanking Show
My New Chew Toy
Bob Baxter
And I Am

Article Morgue

The Jerky Boys
Nita's Hideaway Brawl
Why I Left Burning Man -- and Why I'm Returning


A Brief Review of Sonic Outlaws

by Deuce of Clubs

(First published in Planet Magazine, 04jul1995)

 

Craig Baldwin's Sonic Outlaws is much more than the story of Negativland's troubles with U2 and Island Records. It's an informal history of "culture jamming" and various forms of detournement, a term made popular by Situationist theorists. Detournement means the taking of existing artifacts and modifying them to convey meanings different from their original or intended meanings.

Starting with portions of the offending Negativland record— including some of the Casey Kasem parts—the film runs at blurry speed through a veritable police line-up of "sonic outlaws," including Negativland, the Tape-beatles, Doug Kahn, John Oswald, and the Emergency Broadcast Network, all of whom share the goal (as expressed in the film by Negativland's Chris Grigg) to "turn the [media] barrage back on itself."

Sonic Outlaws is interesting also in that the film itself is an example of copyright violation for art's sake, in that it uses tons of stock film footage and television video captures. Baldwin's footage was shot mostly in 16mm, but parts were shot with the beloved Fisher-Price PXL-2000 toy video camera. This one is not to be missed.

© Deuce of Clubs


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